Capitol Hill can be a troubling place. There’s name-calling, grandstanding, duplicity, occasional corruption, and more bad policy than one writer could ever fully address. There are also hordes of lobbyists dressed to the nines trying to coax Capitol Hill staffers to their side, a big reason Congress adopted so-called temptation rules barring gifts to lawmakers and their aides. But every once in a while there is a shiny example of what is good on Capitol Hill – when political parties drop the charade, when lawmakers put aside petty differences, and when good policy that benefits large numbers of Americans is enacted into law – like the Child Tax Credit (CTC).

The CTC was originally a part of the House Republicans’ Contract with America, and it was eventually championed and passed as part of the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997. The original tax credit provided a $500-per-child nonrefundable credit. That means that it primarily benefited middle- and upper-income families, but it was a start. The thing about kids is that they are expensive, and the costs can be a major disincentive to have kids. While $500 dollars of tax relief obviously didn’t fully offset this cost, it did slightly ease the burdens associated with having and raising kids in the first place. H …